Start with HOW – The Dividing Factor Infographic

Start with HOW – The Dividing Factor Infographic

You may have Heard about Start with Why. While the notion is very sound, the Leadership and culture Issues that arise when different approaches to achieving the What and the Why appear, often prevents the ultimate objectives. This becomes the Dividing Factor that affects the outcome. BUT, if you try and force people to use only one approach, you will KILL innovation and the passion that comes with it! So their must be multiple HOW’s to achieve greater results. And when we incorporate or even tolerate different HOW’s, we build trust, synergy and engagement. The problem usually arises when YOUR HOW has been very successful for you and then Assume that the same HOW will be successful for others

When part of the objective is to improve Engagement, Efficiency and Motivation to improve the bottom line, the “Why” and an understanding of the individual “HOW” cannot be separated. While more profit is essential to sustainable business, focusing only on profit is not always the most effective way to achieve it. Here is an Infographic that will provide insights to understanding your How to live up to your Why in the process of achieving your What.

 

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Arthur

Start with WHY - HOW infographic

652 thoughts on “Start with HOW – The Dividing Factor Infographic

  1. Hi my name is Olivie and I just love this organizational development infographic, is Arthur Carmazzi the designer or just the creator

  2. I agree with all here, your infographics are great and make leadership and people development so easy to apply, thank you Mr Carmazzi

  3. Demetrius Liranzo

    I have only one thing to say about your Start with HOW post. I assume it is a addition to the start with WHY, and this does seem like a good addition, both are important, well done Mr Arthur Carmazzi

  4. You have a true gift for great infographics, i think i have seen most to date. and you Arthur Carmazzi style and branding comes through very neatly.

  5. First off I want to say fantastic infographic! I had a quick question that I’d like to ask if the colored brain is the main element of Start with HOW or are there more elements?
    Appreciate it!

  6. What if there was a way to get everyone in the company to Start with How? I think that the leadership needs to be behind it and we also need training from Mr Arthur Carmazzi. Would be great if there was a way, any ideas?

  7. Arthur Carmazzi, I just wanted to thank you for this info, I’ve been struggling every now and then but looking at this, I was so happy to know that there’s an answer to my questions about organizational culture.

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  9. Hi, Arthur Carmazzi I simply want to tell your ideas on “Start with HOW – The Dividing Factor Infographic” and leadership development are absolutely awesome. Thank you!

  10. Nice leadership training and great description of how to use awareness to develop leadership and change.

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  13. you happen to be always quite kind towards readers like me and help me in my life.Arthur Carmazzi Thank you.

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  31. Winning companies win because they have good leaders who nurture the development of other leaders at all levels of the organization. Thanks for reminding me Arthur Carmazzi

  32. If you were a box of crayons, you’d be the giant name-brand one with the built-in sharpener Mr. Arthur Carmazzi! I like how you inspire people, such a great leadership skill

  33. Wow how come You always know — and say — exactly what I need to hear when I need to hear it, Arthur Carmazzi?

  34. At first glance, I know this is worth the read, always my pleasure to compliment such a good person, Arthur Carmazzi!

  35. Arthur Carmazzi, This post and many other on your website are very interesting mostly on changing company culture.

    You should show your content to a wider audience.

  36. leadership development is so important but management seems to just do as they please with no regard to it
    You should show your content to wider audience so other people will know the wisdom of Arthur Carmazzi

  37. Hello Arthur Carmazzi! seriously, it amazes me how you brought this topic out. I hope to read more about leadership development in the future!

  38. Very particular in leadership development and organizational culture. You are really remarkable person Arthur Carmazzi!

  39. Also, I fully admit that the “psychological benefit of the doubt” can be a very self-righteous and condescending response to another person, but I don’t know of anything better yet. I suppose it’s less condescending if one remains open about ones own temporality of self-control. Emotions are just like that. Or so my experience has been thus far.

  40. The Dividing Factor that affects the outcome. I learned so much from you Arthur Carmazzi mostly on leadership development and leadership training.

  41. The leadership development here deals with ambiguity relief processes right? a person’s HOW is based on the colored brain process for clarity… is that correct… and can be used for leading organizational development and organizational culture change…?

  42. Hi Arthur Carmazzi, I hope you post more of this, it really helps people like me who are having trouble with leadership development. Thanks Arthur Carmazzi!

  43. substantial kind of article. I’ve known you as a well-known speaker, that’s Arthur Carmazzi! I’ll definitely check this page out more often.

  44. Arthur Carmazzi, I can’t wait to see more of this! I wish I could write like you about leadership development. You’re great in doing this.

  45. How do you come up with your ideas? I mean, you are just so awesome Arthur Carmazzi! I want to read the full details of this!

  46. Hi Arthur Carmazzi, I want you to know how much I appreciate your blogs. It really help us out, especially that we’re planning to change company culture.

  47. I’m looking forward to your future blogs Arthur Carmazzi, getting obsessed with how you explained things. I learned something today! All thanks bro Arthur Carmazzi!

  48. That innovation! you nailed it, I need more of you words Arthur Carmazzi about changing company culture which I’m planning in the future.
    Good day Arthur Carmazzi!

  49. great admiration Arthur Carmazzi, Thank you for always giving us the reason to go back where we left our leadership training and development.

  50. A great looking article, there’s so much more about this. I’d like to know more about you speaking organizational culture, Arthur Carmazzi.

  51. The “Why” and an understanding of the individual “HOW” cannot be separated. Oh, I was captivated. I’d like to know more about what you share in life Arthur Carmazzi. I like how you convey with us. Good article. I’ll definitely share this.

  52. An outstanding article! I have just forwarded this onto a colleague who had
    been doing a little research on leadership development and organizational culture. And he, in fact, was very happy stalking your writings! Thanks, Arthur Carmazzi!

  53. You always excite your audience with your new articles Arthur Carmazzi! For sure this one will greatly impact our organizational culture and leadership training. Thank god you’re always there to lighten up our burden.

  54. Those questions are always bugging me, Arthur Carmazzi. I wonder how to get the full article about this one, hope it will help me about leadership development and leadership training.

  55. Arthur Carmazzi, The efficiency of your training programs is really promising. Bringing in the emotional connect is what is missing out in most leadership training but you always connect naturally with us. Thank you!

  56. Arthur Carmazzi, a great write up on the nuances and needs of training in any organizational culture. True to the explanation in the write up.

  57. Your approach to your audience is what I like the most sir Arthur Carmazzi. I can’t explain how much I need the leadership training you provide.

  58. I enjoyed your article definitely and most of all I enjoyed the way in which you handled the dividing factor infographic, Arthur Carmazzi.

  59. I truly enjoy looking through this short article, it contains good content particularly for leadership development, these are the leadership development I need to complete my leadership training.

  60. I have been checking out some of your stories and I can claim nice stuff. I will definitely bookmark your website, Arthur Carmazzi. Worth following.

  61. Oh man, I was blown away. I like this phrase though, ” if you try and force people to use only one approach, you will KILL innovation and the passion that comes with it”
    You nailed it Arthur Carmazzi!

  62. I’m impressed! always impressed with how you divide each of the ideas in here where anyone will understand, Arthur Carmazzi. You know how to get my attention quickly. I like your style on writing about organizational culture. up for this!

  63. I like the way you express what you mean in here Arthur Carmazzi, it’s precisely explained. Arthur Carmazzi you truly are awesome at this. Your leadership skill is unexplainable.

  64. Totally agree with you Arthur Carmazzi. Focusing only on profit is not always the most effective way to achieve it. I always find your articles concerning leadership development useful. Thank you brother.

  65. What a great motivation to start the day. All thanks to Arthur Carmazzi, always a good speaker for organizational culture talk. Keep it up, man. Follow his words and you’ll never be sorry.

  66. I’m thinking to have a talk with Mr. Arthur Carmazzi in the future, really his articles are awesome. A good read about leadership training and all. Good job!

  67. Love the Start with How idea. I find all Arthur Carmazzi’s ideas unique at least. this is a great infographic too. Thank you Arthur Carmazzi… you are awesome

  68. Shared! I think there’s a lot of things I need to know about this article. I’d like to thank you Mr. Arthur Carmazzi for your awesome articles!

  69. I was really inspired reading Arthur Carmazzi’s blog especially THIS one in which it actually open up my mind about my ‘why’. This just means that he really is known for what he does.
    He really is great when it comes to leadership development.

  70. Thanks for always being willing to lend a hand to those business-minded people like me who are also struggling ..by always explaining organizational culture to us. Thank you.

  71. You come up with fantastic ideas on leadership development on Arthur Carmazzi, the way you explain here the thing that kills our innovation, what and how we can overcome it, it’s just impressive. Well, as always, you are impressive though

  72. What’s your secret Arthur Carmazzi? Your output on leadership development, is impressive, to say the least. I wanted to learn more about this article of yours, I wonder how I can read more. Anyway, Thank you so much!

  73. Wow! Nice work. Easy to understand Arthur Carmazzi! This is where we’re struggling a lot to be honest and I must say this somehow enlightened our team. Thank you dear!

  74. Right. I believe on that as well, it’s also the same thing that we wanted to imply to our HR team.
    Thank you once again Arthur Carmazzi

  75. This should be required reading for literally everyone on the planet. It has completely changed how I look at and think about almost everything, especially writing. So insightful. Words can’t express how life-changing this Arthur Carmazzi’s blog is.

  76. I don’t usually write reviews, and I’m not going to change that by writing a really long one. So, all I’m going to say about this article is this: If you are interested in how people are illogically passionate about some things but not others, then read this Arthur Carmazzi’s blog, you can also follow his YouTube channel if you’re into leadership development, then I think you’re with the right person then.

  77. Still amused with how you detailed your thoughts in here Arthur Carmazzi! This article was not only educational, informative and inspirational, it was incredibly motivational on a higher level.

  78. Brittanie Courchene

    Thanks for this Arthur Carmazzi, I’m glad I bumped into your blog. I’m in the desperate mode to seek such an inspiring words. I’ve been struggling with our training and developments lately and this one somehow enlightened me.

  79. Another great blog to read, Great concepts, clearly explained and a must-read for anyone struggling business. Arthur Carmazzi used some real examples of leaders and organizations, and they succeed because they focused on how they do what they do.

  80. Don’t get me wrong: that message is extraordinarily important. It’s something I keep in mind every single day as I build my company, as I work on talks, when I write blog posts, and so on. It’s essential to anyone in need of guidance with leadership development.

  81. Arthur Carmazzi’s article essentially has one idea: most brands and leaders tell us to buy or follow by talking about what and why, whereas the great ones start with how.

  82. Arthur Carmazzi offers a life-altering and business-changing message: “Start with how?”. The golden circle – the “why, how, and what” – is grounded in biology. If you were to look at a cross-section of the brain from the top, you’d see that it corresponds perfectly.

  83. I get the message and agree that “HOW?” is probably the most important question any leader should be asking… and answering. Arthur Carmazzi really knows how to develop such a great idea on organizational culture.

  84. This article of Arthur Carmazzi literally explains to us that people buy from a company because they believe in its values, not because of the quality of its products or services. “People don’t buy WHAT you do, they buy HOW you do it.”
    Awesome right? Arthur is really recommended to high-class leadership development training I think.

  85. This article was very well researched and written in a way that indeed gels with the Author Arthur Carmazzi’s “HOW” of inspiring others. The book is based on the premise of most people know what they do. Some know how to do WHAT they do. But very few know HOW they do what they do. Most think from what to how and then on to why.

  86. This is one of the best articles I read on my list. Arthur Carmazzi, a leadership speaker, and writer of this article narrated very clear how great leaders started with HOW and inspired people.

  87. Nice. The why, how, and what. This idea explains why organizational culture and leadership inspire the others. Everybody knows what they do, some know how they do it, very few people know why they do. The way we communicate, think and act is very easy: we go from the clear things we know to the more fuzzy ones. Arthur Carmazzi is trying to point out is that the way something is communicated must be believed in, explained, and people accept it for themselves because THEY believe in it. It is a very inspiring, enlightening and insightful book that I would recommend to anyone!

  88. Arthur Carmazzi presents a compelling vision of how companies, organizations, and individuals can achieve success. His simple message? Start with HOW. Which is to say the guiding principle of our endeavors should be based not on what we do or why we do it, but rather on how we do it.

  89. Awesome! I’m really into this Arthur Carmazzi!People like Martin Luther King Jr., Steve Jobs, and the Wright Brothers might have little in common, but they all started with why. It was their natural ability to start with why that enabled them to inspire those around them and to achieve remarkable things.

  90. I am now wondering what is my “HOW”. maybe I need to follow Arthur Carmazzi from now on to dig my inner question, hope that this leads me to be a successful coach someday, I heard that I can learn from Arthur Carmazzi.

  91. Everything I do in my business aligns with that one purpose. If you’re still not clear on your WHY, that’s okay. Maybe this is the purpose of us reading Arthur Carmazzi’s blog. Very timely for leadership development and changing a culture.

  92. Coaching, writing, and speaking are simply WHATs for me. If I found a better way to unleash potential, I would do that instead. All that matters is that I create a spark. Thanks for enlighting the idea Arthur Carmazzi!

  93. Yep, I have heard about Start with Why by Simon Sinek, that was also awesome but Arthur Carmazzi’s article seems to be a lot interesting!

  94. Feeling lucky to read an article full of knowledgeable words from Arthur Carmazzi. thanks Arthur for giving your thoughtful ideas to everyone regarding leadership and organizational culture.

  95. Amazing! there are really some questions that can’t live alone I guess and one of those was discussed in here. thanks for this Arthur Carmazzi!

  96. This completed our training. It can’t always be just a training without planting anything on your organizational culture. This simple message of Arthur Carmazzi is worth a share.

  97. Awesome Arthur Carmazzi, this one is recommended to those in need to understand what needs to go first in learning their organization.

  98. very inspiring Sir Arthur Carmazzi, I just saw you on one of the Youtube interviews while I was looking for organizational culture topics and it brings you, I guess I will learn a lot from you then.

  99. From the title itself, it catches my attention immediately, I lose my focus in the middle of stress and found this article very meaningful. Thanks, Arthur Carmazzi, they said you are great with leadership training and yes I guess now it’s proven.

  100. Very clear statement. Thanks, Arthur Carmazzi, you are really good at getting our attention and bring us until the end of the article. This infographic is actually detailed, nothing to ask for.

  101. Hi, Arthur Carmazzi, my name is Jesse and I would like to tell you how much I appreciate your effort on making things clear for me, especially whenever I watch your YouTube channel, there’s a lot to learn about your training on leadership development.

  102. Arthur Carmazzi speaks of the ‘How’ in terms of leadership and the ability to inspire teams. I would argue that teams do not have to wait for the appointed leader to define the How, that this identity can be organically seeded and grow from the inside out.

  103. All organizations start with HOW, but only the great ones keep their HOW clear year after year. Such a simple message to start with, Great admiration Arthur Carmazzi!

  104. We look at the world backward, we try to navigate our life by starting with the wrong questions. This is really helpful when I began intensively working to determine my own personal mission statement. There’s a lot of focus on business in here but I think the principles are very applicable to life.Arthur Carmazzi always stuns me!

  105. Fantastic read, a real simple concept that really goes a long way – Start with How. Finding your purpose at any level, whether it be individually or in business, shines through beyond the numbers and helps you find real meaning in everything that you do. Thanks, Arthur Carmazzi!

  106. Great insights for business builders and marketers. Brief and a bit shallow in some places and refers to some overused examples but from my own first-hand experiences, the concepts are powerful in practice. Thanks, Arthur Carmazzi!

  107. This Arthur Carmazzi’s word reminds me of this quote: Leadership requires two things: a vision of the world that does not exist and the ability to communicate it.

  108. Hi my name is Giovanni, I appreciate your awesome insights on how a leadership training should be. Thank you Arthur Carmazzi.

  109. ArthurCarmazzi, the way he writes. You see, the article is about inspiration, it’s about the power of believes and causes – and the only way I can think of writing about those things convincingly, is to write about them with a whole lot passion. And by golly, Mr. Arthur here does just that.

  110. I don’t usually write reviews, and I’m not going to change that by writing a really long one.

    So, all I’m going to say about this article is this: If you are interested in why people are illogically passionate about some things but not others, follow Arthur Carmazzi

  111. I have read this article twice and loved it both times. It really inspires you to think about your purpose of doing things not just in business but in life. Thanks, Arthur Carmazzi!

  112. Arthur Carmazzi is able to distinguish between manipulation and inspiration. He explains how’s the fist creates all but long-term effects. Organizations, institutions, and companies should use these tools, concentrating on the WHAT and WHY, and forgetting to highlight the HOW.

  113. Arthur Carmazzi doesn’t just focus on the customer but explains the importance of the employee. There are no happy customers without happy employees. Just like customers, who end up buying what they believe to feel achieved, employees have to feel like they belong and share the beliefs of the company to feel like they belong and a are part of something bigger than them. This just clearly explain how leadership training works.

  114. The hiring process is not mechanical. Credentials are important when hiring, but what about motivation and inspiration. A person has to WANT to be part of something and help that something in the process of getting bigger. The WHY of the employees has to fit with the HOW of the company. This will help both sticks together in tougher times and share the glory of happier ones. This I think is what Arthur Carmazzi is implying.

  115. I highly recommend this article and Arthur Carmazzi as well for anyone to read especially to work on their leadership skills. The basic concept of the article that goes throughout the whole topic is to START WITH HOW.

  116. Arthur Carmazzi’s offers a life-altering and business-changing message: “Start with HOW”. Really essential for leadership development training.

  117. “Leadership requires two things: a vision of the world that does not exist and the ability to communicate it.” just awesome Arthur Carmazzi

  118. Fantastic read, a real simple concept that really goes a long way – Start with how. Finding your purpose at any level, whether it be individually or in business, shines through beyond the numbers and helps you find real meaning in everything that you do. Thank you Arthur Carmazzi.

  119. Thanks, Arthur Carmazzi. Finally, I learned, before start doing anything, just to think HOW to do that, then WHAT and then WHY.!!!

  120. I think Arthur Carmazzi articulates well what people think, but struggle to get down in words. I liked some of the stories that were told about different businesses and how they evolved around their ‘why’. It made me think more about my personal ‘HOW’.

  121. After having lost my enthusiasm, getting a picture of the HOW to do what I do was exactly what I needed to move ahead. Awesome guy Arthur Carmazzi.

  122. It presents innovative ideas that inspired me to think deeply about why I’m doing and how. Thanks Arthur Carmazzi.

  123. I remember a quote in this article. “There are only two ways to influence human behavior: you can manipulate it or you can inspire it.” awesome always, Arthur Carmazzi,

  124. Great companies don’t hire skilled people and motivate them, they hire already motivated people and inspire them. Just like how Arthur Carmazzi normally explain it in every possible way.

  125. One of the biggest motivating factors is the fact that company culture is becoming a more popular consideration and development. More companies are shifting their attention to creating more thorough brand cultures and preserving them through ongoing development. It’s at least partially due to the fact that culture is talked about more frequently. Studies have indicated measurable increases in turnover for companies with poor or nonexistent culture, and conversationally, culture is mentioned more frequently between entrepreneurs. I’ll be keeping this words of yours Arthur Carmazzi forever.

  126. Thanks, Arthur Carmazzi. That message is extraordinarily important. It’s something I keep in mind every single day as I build my company, as I work on talks, when I write blog posts, and so on.

  127. I still remember Mr. Arthur Carmazzi once said that attempting to create an all-inclusive organizational culture fit for any personality often leads to an uncomfortable work environment for everyone involved.

  128. Company culture overall is going to become more important, which means all these dimensions will increase in line with that expansion. It is our honor to be guided by a Guru like you Arthur Carmazzi, we’re so thankful that you and your words are there.

  129. How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action, Arthur Carmazzi presents the idea that great leaders inspire others by putting the HOW.

  130. Company culture also adds to your brand identity. If you treat your employees well and have a fun-loving corporate atmosphere, your customers will see you as a fun-loving, generous brand. Depending on your target demographics, that could be a major boon for sales and customer loyalty. I really love this part of your blog Sir Arthur Carmazzi. I am looking forward to your further blogs.

  131. A strong company culture attracts better talent and, more importantly, retains that talent. When people feel like they belong to an organization, they’re more likely to stick around for the long term. That means lower turnover, fewer new hires to deal with, and better chemistry among your team. Another word of wisdom that I got from you sir Arthur Carmazzi. You are so amazing and so inspiring, sir!

  132. Sometimes company culture developed through default, while in other companies there was intentional execution to drive and promote the culture. As new leaders come into an organization they often are encouraged to adopt and follow existing practices. It depends all depends, so it is better to make or developed an effective culture that the company will gonna use from its effectivity. Some helping words I’ve learned from Arthur Carmazzi. Thank you as always for the knowledge, God bless you!

  133. For many venture-backed companies, the elements of their organizational culture originated with the founder or other leaders who were instrumental in the early stages of the organization. That is way, making or building an organizational culture is very important as it will be the foundation of the company from the start that culture was created. We are very thankful that Gurus like you sir Arthur Carmazzi are here to educate us and inspire us. Thank you so much.

  134. You don’t have to have a name like Google to understand how organizational culture can drive a business strategy. To be unique and learn how to be effective, this is what you must concern. I had learned some ways and techniques in following Sir Arthur Carmazzi. Thank you so much, sir!

  135. As per what sir Arthur Carmazzi said, organizational culture is often thought of as that touchy-feely stuff that is difficult to define and should be left up to Human Resources to manage. You are the best sir! I’ll be continuing following you!

  136. Hiring an employee is an investment, and you want to make sure you invest in the right people. By ensuring each individual you hire fits well with the company culture, you make it more likely they will stay with your company long term and contribute more to the success of the organization. As per what you had explained Arthur Carmazzi, I’ll make sure to invest in the right person starting today. Thank you so much for the reminder!

  137. While skill sets and experience are important when hiring new members for your organization, you also need to hire for culture fit. An employee’s skills may get them in the door, but your company culture is what will keep them there. I’ll treasure this knowledge that you’ve shared to us Arthur Carmazzi, and will share this with others.

  138. Employees who are more enthusiastic about the companies they work for tend to be more productive. That means more work and more business being done. Your employees’ enthusiasm will also be apparent to your organizational culture, customers and be an attractive selling point for them. I’ll make sure to take note and use this on the future Sir Arthur Carmazzi.

  139. Your employees shouldn’t dread coming to work. They should enjoy coming to the office and value the work that they do. Companies with a strong organizational culture have employees who like the challenges of their job, get along well with their co-workers and enjoy the atmosphere of the workplace. Thank you so much, Mr. Arthur Carmazzi, I’ll continue following your works.

  140. Base on Mr. Arthur Carmazzi, another way to characterize company culture is to think of it as your brand’s personality. Company culture is what makes your brand unique and gives it that special edge. It puts your company’s soul on display and tells the world who you are as a brand.

  141. Culture has always been important, but today, it’s becoming more than just a buzzword. Company culture is an important differentiator to set your company apart from the competition. It’s also what attracts the right talent and brings in the right customers.

  142. When you put a focus on organizational culture, you’ll have guiding principles. People will know you for this. Employees will live by it. It’ll help get you through difficult times. You’ll base hiring and firing decisions on the principles. It’ll help get all employees working on the same company mission. In some sense, it’s the glue that keeps the company together. I really this note of you Arthur Carmazzi.

  143. When you define company culture, you’re also defining your company’s values and goals. These will contribute to your company’s mission and show your employees and the public what is most important to the brand.

  144. You need to build a community within your organization that people want to be a part of. Make your company culture the foundation of that community. Some words of wisdom that I’ll gonna make use of in the future for sure, thank you so much Mr. Arthur Carmazzi!

  145. “An organizational culture may be one of its strongest assets or it can be its biggest liability.” Thanks for this knowledge Mr. Arthur Carmazzi, I will make sure to make it my asset and drive the company to grow more. I’ll do my best to prevent it from being my liability.

  146. Venture-backed companies understand the key importance of financial performance. They often live and die by it. The board will generally have stated goals around spending control, revenue generation and/or revenue growth. Company culture, on the other hand, is rarely a metric that is monitored or viewed at an organizational level or by the venture companies that back the organization. I salute you Sir Arthur Carmazzi for a great job of lecturing and inspiring many people with your words.

  147. Now I realize that company culture is not just about having Nerf guns and scooters in the hallway. Company culture exists in every organization, whether it is by design or by default. Thank you so much Arthur Carmazzi, I am looking forward on your next blogs.

  148. Company culture contributes to the identity and values of your company. I’m sure I’ll gonna use this words many times so I’ll gonna keep this in mind. Thank you for sharing this Mr. Arthur Carmazzi.

  149. Company culture has arguably always been important, but it’s only become a popular point of discussion in the past 20 years or so. To some, it’s become a buzzword, losing some of its meaning due to the overabundance of content and discussions surrounding it. I’ll continue following you Arthur Carmazzi for further knowledge you are sharing.

  150. If your company culture is one that prioritizes setting and meeting goals, your individual workers will be more likely to set and meet goals of their own. It’s a good way to set and maintain the direction of your employees, and without it, it’s hard to keep your company’s values coherent.

  151. If you don’t at least keep pace with a strong company culture and find a way to differentiate yourself, you’re going to fall behind. I will keep this in mind sir Arthur Carmazzi so that I won’t fall behind.

  152. A company culture deck is a series of slides using short phrases, images or examples to define and describe the behavior of your organization. Base on what Sir Arthur Carmazzi said, “business leaders should develop this unique to their firm, then share it with everyone on your team, from top execs to new hires.”

  153. Company culture and strong communication is the key. In organization’s where good communication is encouraged, where upper-level executives freely communicate with lower-level employees and vice versa with respect and without judgment, a company often implements an open-door communication policy with their employees. When a company has good communication among its employees, it can often avoid conflict as employees work through challenges. Companies that are not transparent and do not disseminate information well to everyone, typically have a hard time achieving strong business results, or even staying in business.

  154. The best people, always want to work with the best companies, and the best people are the catalyst for creating ongoing business success. Talented humans want to do business with best organizations because it aligns with their own values and expectations. These talented people, partners, and clients see your company culture as a strong differentiator, of how you do business, rather than solely on your products or services alone. Very well said, Arthur Carmazzi, any individual would love to work in a worth it company where they’ll spend their talent.

  155. Your company culture is the formula, the DNA that provides guidelines, boundaries, and expectations for your team and your customers, and is the primary platform to inspiring and motivating your people, and is the most powerful resource you have to attract, recruit, hire and retain the highest level of talent to your business. I compiled this knowledge that I learned from studying and following you sir Arthur Carmazz. Please continue on lecturing us.

  156. Your company culture defines for you and for all others, how your organization does business, how your organization interacts with one another and how the team interacts with the outside world, specifically your customers, employees, partners, suppliers, media and all other stakeholders.

  157. A strong company culture, in which members agree upon and care intensely about organizational values, can improve business performance by motivating employees and coordinating their behavior towards a vision and specific performance goals that benefit the company.

  158. As per what I have learned so far in following Arthur Carmazzi is that the definition of organizational culture is a shared set of shared values and norms that characterize a particular organization.

  159. Organizational culture consists of shared beliefs and values established by the organization’s leaders and then communicated and reinforced through various methods, ultimately shaping employee perceptions, behaviors, and understanding.

  160. A positive culture in business today is, unfortunately, the exception rather than the norm, but a strong organizational culture can clearly differentiate a business from its competitors in the mind of its stakeholders. This is a big help and additional knowledge for me Mr. Arthur Carmazzi. Thank you.

  161. Millennials see the world differently, necessitating a change in organizational cultural priorities in today’s workplaces. The company must adjust even a little to what people need or what’s trend. I’ll be looking up for this Sir Arthur Carmazzi.

  162. Arthur Carmazzi nailed it. I have witnessed businesses that speak often of an intentional culture only to make exceptions that bring their organizational culture to a halt. True commitment to the desired culture should not be sacrificed for a short-term gain. Staying the course has a greater payoff.

  163. Lay it out beautifully in regards to their organizational culture. This is what needed to be done by the new startup to retain their most talented team players in their organization. Thanks, Arthur Carmazzi.

  164. Thank you for sharing this Arthur Carmazzi, one important aspect that deserves mentioning is that even though company culture should be set by leadership, it is important to involve all people in the company to help set and shape those values and vision. This creates a sense of ownership so that employees take it as their own and not a forced system defined from the top.

  165. Now, after following my favorite Guru, Sir Arthur Carmazzi, I now realize that company culture is very essential in so many businesses. Thank you so much for making us realize that.

  166. Working within an organization of values, character and strong company culture will help you be more successful. If you are not there now, you should go find it. Go for it and you’ll soon find it said by my favorite Guru, Sir Arthur Carmazzi. Your words are so inspiring as ever.

  167. If culture is important to your company’s success, address it often and often publicly recognize individuals, teams or units that exemplify or demonstrate what your organizational culture is and what you aspire to be.

  168. The most common mistake in regards to company culture is defining it, only to soon forget about it. I will do my best to prevent this common mistake Arthur Carmazzi. Thank you so much for guiding us.

  169. Develop the discipline to consider new hire that is compatible with your company culture and reinforces its importance to all involved in the onboarding process. A very informative word I got from you Arthur Carmazzi. You are the best.

  170. When businesses are growing rapidly, it’s easy to justify hiring candidates with impressive resumes or recommendations, without first considering if they’ll fit into the organizational culture.

  171. Often the faces of the company, they will show others how to live the company culture every day. This sure will help many companies in handling their and molding their own organizational culture sir Arthur Carmazzi. Thank you.

  172. One pointer that until now I am treasuring that is from Mr. Arthur Carmazzi is to develop a truly great organizational culture, there can only be one model. This means no special rules or exceptions for any subgroup, including top executives. As such, your leadership team should consist of the strongest cultural fits. Often the faces of the company, they will show others how to live the corporate culture every day.

  173. There absolutely are a number of factors that encourage people to do their best at work, and all of them are closely tied to company culture or at least, they should be. Thank you for pointing out this factors Arthur Carmazzi, I’ll keep it in mind and make a proper use to it.

  174. We’re going to look at some of the ways that the cultivation of company culture can pay off for you in the long run. Some of them may just surprise you. I’ll gonna watch out about it Arthur Carmazzi.

  175. Entrepreneurs and business leaders are in the unique position of cultivating company cultures that can do a huge amount of good in the modern world, in ways that reach far beyond the walls of your office. I hope to build an appropriate and perfect company culture on my own, gonna continue to follow you Sir Arthur Carmazzi. I wanted it to learn from the expert.

  176. If ever company culture just “kinda happens,” that’s not to say that it doesn’t require a nurturing touch. There are companies with underdeveloped and even seemingly oppressive cultures, and you certainly don’t want your organization to be one of those. Thank you for this pointer Sir Arthur Carmazzi, I’ll certainly look forward to it. I don’t wanna fall to that category.

  177. If “three’s a crowd,” then four’s a culture. In fact, a company culture happens wherever people gather whether we try to make it happen or not. Got it from an amazing Guru, Sir Arthur Carmazzi!

  178. Frankly, nearly anything that creates more face time between your employees and gets them out of their own heads and away from their computer monitors can help create a workplace that crackles with enthusiasm and atmosphere, and which encourages dialogue, understanding, and cooperation. No man or woman is an island and a company full of islands and doesn’t want to accept your organizational culture won’t be long for this world. An amazing note from Arthur Carmazzi, your such an amazing Guru!

  179. Today’s organizations struggle with two big changes – a new generation of employees and rapid restructuring of businesses. These two fundamental changes bring challenges that companies need to overcome in order to survive and keep their reputations. But these changes have their impact on individuals, too. This is why talent acquisition becomes harder over time. The new situation inevitably brings an increased need for setting a strong and effective organizational culture. I am looking forward to your next blogs, I wanted to know more about this and conquer it through your guidance Sir Arthur Carmazzi. Thank God that Gurus like you are here to help us!

  180. An important thing that’s a core piece of company culture is all the processes of hiring and firing employees. This also includes the reasons and ways in which employees get rewarded. I am thinking that maybe this phrase may also include the HR department am I correct Sir Arthur Carmazzi?

  181. You can analyze the organizational culture through documents the company issues internally or externally, and through the formal or informal stories that the leadership and employees share. This was a big one Arthur Carmazzi, very interesting as ever. Thank you.

  182. You can tell a lot about a certain company culture by the language people use. This includes the way they use technical terms, make jokes, and use slang and metaphors. I will always bring this tip as my guideline Arthur Carmazzi so that I can easily identify it by my self.

  183. This includes values, beliefs, behaviors, and artifacts that determine how the company works and adapts to its surroundings. Every day companies communicate with their internal and external audiences creating artifacts that point to their organizational culture.

  184. Company culture is more important than you might think. This was the word that until now is I am holding, and keeps me to be inspired and challenged every day. Thank you for sharing this Arthur Carmazzi.

  185. Agreed Arthur Carmazzi. I had a discussion just today about “Company Culture” that is relevant. It seems that every company realizes that culture is important in creating success towards corp goals.

  186. Great article Arthur Carmazzi, the value of company culture can’t be overstated. Arthur also suggests values are made relevant and ‘front of mind’ at a team level. Teams ability to own and get regular feedback on how they’re aligning with values is extremely important. Thank you, Sir!

  187. Creating and maintaining company culture has been important ever since people started gathering and joining their efforts in a shared cause, whether they were aware of it or not. But today, a strong and effective culture must be a conscious decision for any organization that wants to stand out in this crowded business world.

  188. It’s all about relationships, Mr. Arthur Carmazzi said. As a business leader, there’s plenty you can do to create this kind of open and collaborative atmosphere. You can encourage employees to cross-train and pick up skills from other teams, and you can go out of your way to encourage or create social events, like team excursions to happy hour for the sake of involving them and let them expose to your organizational culture.

  189. Arthur Carmazzi shared the key causal relationship between employee happiness in their workplace and their general productivity. It’s a timely reminder that worker well-being needs to be a central tenet of any company culture initiative.

  190. Company culture is bound to happen regardless of whether you manage it or not, you can also take measures to ensure your employees are growing into a cohesive team with a shared vision.

  191. There are very few leaders, products, or companies that create movements. Very few leaders that inspire loyalty, not just a single transaction. Arthur Carmazzi knows what he’s doing for sure!

  192. An organization’s history will include a range of experience with change initiatives that will inform attitudes toward the present one. Its culture will encourage or discourage innovation and risk-taking based on that history. Staff will have expectations, attitudes, and skills that help or hinder their ability to engage in a change initiative. Strategies for communication, participation, training, and the negotiation of roles and responsibilities must be tailored to the needs of the organization.

  193. Each organization has a unique history, culture, and staff. These variables should be assessed before a change process begins. The strategy for change must consider the organization’s current capacity and capability for change.

  194. The assessment that leads to change is an important, but often overlooked, element in the success of a change process. In examining the potential for change, there are basically three possible assessments that can be made other than maintaining an acceptable status quo: that something needs to be improved; that something is broken, but can be fixed; or that something needs to be done differently. In any organization and for any given situation, the assessment is likely to vary among individuals, depending on the type and depth of their knowledge about the situation, and their position in the organization. Disagreement over approach or strategy is often rooted in disagreement overassessment.

  195. A project that takes into account the human element by its very nature takes longer to complete. It anticipates the consensus building and learning that must take place for the process to succeed. It leaves in its wake individuals excited about the positive potential of change because they have experienced it firsthand. New process skills are developed that permit the next project to take place more swiftly and efficiently.

  196. It is important to consider the process in the overall management of an organization. Today’s workplace requires individuals to have the emotional and intellectual capacity to be flexible enough for continuous change regardless of their job or position. They must have the skills to be successful within this context. For an organization to thrive, a bias toward innovation is required.

  197. A project that takes into account the human element by its very nature takes longer to complete. It anticipates the consensus building and learning that must take place for the process to succeed. It leaves in its wake individuals excited about the positive potential of change because they have experienced it firsthand. New process skills are developed that permit the next project to take place more swiftly and efficiently.

  198. Usually, it takes the same amount of time to complete a project whether the human element is engaged or not. If the affected individuals are not engaged, the questions and concerns draw out the process well beyond the time frame envisioned by the planners. In the end, the organization is left with anger and mistrust that makes it equally, if not more, difficult to undertake the next major change.

  199. The importance of process management in project management. The main purpose of a project is to deliver a product or service to the customer and you cannot deliver any product or service without following certain processes so you can’t even move a step without process management. Moreover, when our main job is to deliver the product or service then it is our duty to monitor the product at each step right from start till the manufacturing of a product. It is highly recommended to take care of all the processes being taken place in your project as project management is all about process management. Do you know managing a project is itself a process as you follow certain steps, methods and tools for it just like you do in process management so from now onwards do not think them as two different things? Instead, they are much like the same things.

  200. Process management is the management or monitoring of a process from start till the end. The process can be anyone but here as we are talking with respect to project management so process means manufacturing or any other related process which ends up giving a final product. Project management, on the other hand, is the administration and supervision of a specific venture and it involves planning to organize, leading and controlling.

  201. The main purpose of this article is to know that whether process management is required in project management or not and if it is required then how it works and why is it so important. First of all, I must tell you that process management is not only included in project management but it is very crucial for it. In fact, it acts as a driving force which helps you to perform project management tasks efficiently and effectively. Some of the experts also say that both of them that are process management and project management have a strong relationship with each other and each of them supports or enhance the effect of another one.

  202. The Risk Alternatives is the importance of process. this will emphasize one process above others: the Risk Cycle, the repeating steps a nonprofit, startup, or small business takes in order to implement a risk management process. More broadly, however, we will explore the numerous benefits of identifying, following, and improving processes in every aspect of an organization.

  203. While procedures themselves may not demonstrate compliance, well-defined and documented processes (i.e. procedures, training materials) along with records that demonstrate process capability can make evident an effective internal control system and compliance to regulations and standards.

  204. Complying with laws and regulations should be the most basic function of an organization. Even the smallest of organizations must comply with tax laws and with state and local regulations (i.e. zoning, licensing), while some organization must cope with a myriad of federal and state laws and regulations. Other compliance issues may deal with quality standards like ISO 9001, ISO 22000, or UL.

  205. There are page-long lists of why policies and procedures are necessary, but, of course, such long lists lose meaning and value. By the time you read to the bottom, you don’t remember what was at the top of the list. Plus, such long lists have too much overlap and repetition. A simple approach may be more useful. The purpose of creating an internal control system through defining and documenting processes with well-written procedures boils down to a few very basic reasons.

  206. “Why do we have processes and procedures?” Have you heard that question before? Perhaps you were even the one asking it. How happy were you with the answer you gave, or with the one you received? Frequently people struggle to give a clear and meaningful response to such an obvious question. It is, however, probably one of the most important questions to answer before starting or updating a system of policies and procedures.

  207. When I say “your people,” I’m not just referring to your employees, although obviously, they are important. Instead, I’m talking about all your relationships. I call these people my stakeholders, as they have a vested interest in the success of our company. This group consists of employees, customers, vendors, suppliers, and advisers.

  208. The process is so critical that it’s often overlooked as a technical item. Processes are the steps you’d take to perform a function, such as making a sales presentation, delivering a service or answering the phone.

  209. Implementing a business workflow process forces each business to review their processes in fine detail. This exercise is a great way to find out what areas of workflow need work or are missing completely. I’ve assisted customers to create a complete workflow system starting with nothing. After discussing general workflow with management I interviewed department managers and created workflow documentation that was later reviewed and approved by management. This allowed the business to see the areas that lacked detail in the process. Once we defined those areas, managers were able to “fill the gap” with new process documentation to give employees clear definition of the process.
    Whether you’re a large enterprise business or a small 20-user company, Business Workflow Process can help you become more efficient and more profitable. To find out more about our consulting services that include Enterprise Resource Planning, IT Infrastructure Planning, and Process Workflow Management, contact NetWork Center, Inc. for more information.

  210. Defining a workflow process will allow you to review and compare it to your technology plan. Creating, or changing your process workflow can have a substantial effect on your IT infrastructure. Knowing ahead of time will help you budget for those changes.

    While developing and implementing a process is important, defining your future workflow processes will also help you plan for your future technology needs as well. Try to work on a future process plan. Maybe it’s a wish list of improvements, or a plan to add additional users or steps in the process. Having clear sight of your future process workflows will help predict and plan for those changes.

  211. Having a defined workflow process will enable you to better serve your customers. Aligning your business processes to the needs of your customers is a win-win solution. One of the business characteristics customers look for is confidence and consistency within a business. Simply put, if you are confident in your processes, your customers will be confident in you.

  212. Business workflow processes can help enforce the policies of your business. You can direct users to refer to the workflow documentation for the proper process to follow. Within the workflow, documentation is sure to reference specific policies within the process. This simple addition to your business model will help ensure your customers are treated in a consistent manner and increase your level of business process continuity.

  213. No two people do their job exactly the same, so to operate a business with a great deal of efficiency, the trick is to get them to work together fluently. Business workflow can be created down to the individual job level. This not only gives you control and insight into your business process but also gives you security and consistency during employment turnover. Operating a business with a loose process structure can be costly when dealing with correcting errors and managing damage control. Every business should have a repository of process flow charts and workflow definition documents.

  214. I have heard that some processes “do not affect other parts of the company”. Whilst HR looks after the employees across the organization the question was asked whether their processes could be improved in isolation. I have worked with a number of HR departments, in manufacturing companies and large government organizations. Even in these HR processes, the whole organization has been involved and affected.

  215. The process goes right across the organization. A Sales process may start with marketing and production (lets set the targets right!). It may involve accounts (let’s get the price right). It will involve sales (close the deal). Then it will go back to accounts (let’s get the invoice right and paid on time). Production’s input may involve the supply chain. Therefore our sales process will not just involve accounts receivables but accounts payable too.

  216. There are some truths and sayings that stand the test of time. One I like is along the lines of:

    “if you always do what you always did, you’ll always get what you always got”

    In other words, when you are looking for a different outcome, think about what you do and change it. Too often we think about the detail. We look at the activity we are involved with and try to find a better way of being more efficient. We may indeed be more efficient if we keep the stapler on the right-hand side of the desk, or arrange the furniture better. In the office world, the ‘what you do’ should be broader than the activity, the document, the technology. The organization should focus on the sum of all these and how they flow together in complete business processes.

  217. Process and protocol are all about balance. Too little and you lack direction and consistency, too much and you strangle creativity and action. Just the right amount, however, can be a real competitive advantage.

  218. Process is vital for any competitive business. It’s the difference between the occasionally outstanding and the consistently good. I am in favor of this article, I agree that bringing the process before the purpose is essential and reasonable.

  219. Often people amble through their working lives feeling unmotivated and underappreciated, but they keep going. Even when they experience dissonance at work, many push it to the back of their mind continuing to work towards their own sense of purpose, be that making money to support the family or getting through the 9-5 so they can begin their hobby. This is unsustainable; employees become unhappy, demotivated and stop fulfilling their potential. Giving your talent a sense of purpose at work can mean the difference between them doing a great job and a mediocre one. More than this is the dividing factor that might push them to totally lose their innovation, passion, and love to the work and worst is they might quit. That is why I agree with the concept of putting the HOW before the WHY, this is basically giving your men a chance to adjust and both parties wouldn’t have any casualties in the end. A win-win situation, thank you so much for such a wonderful article. This is very helpful!

  220. Every one of us is working towards something, be it getting through difficult times in life or bettering ourselves at a hobby or desirable trait. Everyone has a sense of purpose; without it, we lose our way and become demotivated and depressed. Studies have shown that when people are contributing to a higher purpose, they are likely to have a healthier outlook on life and be more resilient to stress. The same is true in the workplace.

  221. The concept of bringing the why before the how’s has grown in stature and importance in almost every area of life, and has lead to an influx of books, audio, courses and video guides pointing us all in one direction- but is it the right direction for everyone? There are some that really became successful using this concept, however, this is not applicable for everyone for sure. Just like me, I am really amazed and I can’t say that bringing the why before the how is really helpful but it didn’t fit my style and my view for a business. I am more of understanding, caring and thinking of my people for their betterment, innovation in their work and for them to love more their job. For me, it is not always for the company’s benefits, sometimes it is also for the happiness of both parties.

  222. The importance of purpose isn’t a new concept and in fact has been around since the Mark Twain era when he opened up the floodgates of conceptual thinking by announcing – “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why”. However, in today’s generation, businesses should also take care of their people properly, know how to handle them well and know how to hype and motivate them timely.

  223. Speaking about Goals and Goal setting can open up a whole host of when, where, how’s and ifs. There’s no question that the details and strategies of any self-improvement tactic are vital, but let’s not forget the most critical component of this – the WHY! However, as I’ve encountered this article I can say in the business world I am more of to start with how.

  224. I don’t know that changing company culture may sometimes lead to dividing factor of the people within the organization. This really is helpful for me, without realizing it I may bring the company down by a small mistake or wrong decision.

  225. Comparing this 2 method which resembles each other, I will go with the “start with how” method which was discussed in this article. I am into caring of the employee and I believe that it is fair enough to give back somehow to them as a reward for their hard work.

  226. To be able to become a good or a quality leader, you also have to manage well and take care of the heart and soul, the manpower of your company. You must think them and involve them in every decision that was made for the company. Of course, the priority will be the company’s benefits, the thought is that you just need to consider your men and if the decision might affect them big or will lead them to struggle so much that might lead to the extent that their passion and love if their work will be affected. And I best understand in this article that the concept start with how is best explaining that and it is the more appropriate approach.

  227. I am the type of a leader which is thinking of his people and subordinates, I always include them in my plans and make sure that they’ll benefit with it along with the company. This is my way of handling them and this is also my way of thanking them for their hard works every single day of work. As I have encountered both methods “start with why” and this method “start with how”, I am more into this method which was explained by Mr. Arthur. I think this method will suit well my techniques and beliefs in work.

  228. Knowing what is “start with why” and upon reading this article, I can confidently say that in changing company culture it is best to use the method “start with how” which was Mr. Arthur Carmazzi tackled here. I am into caring the people within the organization because, without them, any business will not stand where it is standing and they can’t reach success without those people, also, this is my way of giving back them the favor of their loyalness, hard work, and love in their jobs.

  229. There are leaders and there are those who lead. Start With Why is about a naturally occurring pattern, a way of thinking, acting and communicating that gives some leaders the ability to inspire those around them. However, I discovered that starting with how instead is way better and also this will assure you that the people within the organization will not lead to dividing factor.

  230. Start With Why inspires people to do the things that inspire them. We believe in a bright future and our ability to build it together. We give keynotes, facilitate workshops and develop software that inspires individuals and organizations to live their Why. However, I believe this article that instead of the “why” the “how” must be prioritized. It is better to start with the process and let your people adjust to where or how they are comfortable and sustain their love, passion, and dedication to their work.

  231. In Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action, the idea that great leaders inspire others by putting the Why (the purpose) before the How (the process), or the What (the product). Start with Why created waves of discussion and change around our office. On the other hand, this article clearly states that it is best to choose and start with how (the process) before letting them know the why (the purpose) and then the what (the product). Leaders should at least think of the people and let them do and adjust to where they would be more comfortable to continue working along with the new purpose. The worst-case scenario might be led to dividing factor as explained here if you don’t think about them completely.

  232. I best learned here that in changing company culture, giving a value to the employees is also a great move and to be able to do that this was the best method, “Start with How”. This is so great Sir! I’ll be looking forward to more of your blogs.

  233. What is better between WHY or HOW in changing company culture. It all depends on the leadership skill of who’ll perform it and how they’ll respond back when the worst case scenario occurred.

  234. Sometimes in changing company culture, a risk is necessary. You should be not thinking about it but to focus on what you need to do so it will gonna be successful and in the end, there’ll be no casualty either on your company or your employee.

  235. I learned here that it is not bad to risk and to be unique in handling an organizational culture. At the end of the day, it will depend on how you handle and deliver it, and how you’ll gonna bounce back if you fail to do so.

  236. If you are planning on rewriting your organizational culture, you might consider trying things that are out of the box, unique and risky. Once it succeeds, I am sure that the relief and the achievement feel more special.

  237. It is really hard to take a risk on changing company culture, however, this blog best motivates and explain that it is alright to be different and do not follow the traditional way where many companies were based, it is alright to take a risk. If you really can’t afford to do it, then make some preventive measures that will save you if this fails if you are not that confident and convince in regards to this matter.

  238. Arthur Carmazzi, I just wanted to thank you for this information, I’ve been struggling every now and then but looking at this, I was so happy to know that there’s an answer to my questions about organizational culture.

  239. For what I’ve learned to this blog, it specifies that it is alright to be unique in building your organization’s culture but you should have a preventive measure or you should think what would be this cause the company. Carefully think if this would bring down the company.

  240. This blog best describes to be unique on changing company culture by starting with HOW instead of starting with WHY and WHAT which was typical. It also describes here that using this idea is not 100% because of the success of it still vary to the individual who’ll apply this to their organization.

  241. This is a big help! It is very assuring to know this staff, this prevents me from doing such things. On the other hand, now I know what to do and what are the things I should consider before implementing things.

  242. This was the best explanation and precaution upon changing company culture. There such thing we called dividing factor that is not healthy for a company and worst was this move might kill the innovation and the passion that is running in that certain organization.

  243. To achieve a true teaching and learning methodology requires non-traditional strategies like cooperative and collaborative learning. Another major aspect where centers for learning fail is in developing students’ ability to solve real-life problems.

  244. Technology is a great enabler. And while it “enables” business, that process can also start earlier, at the learning stage. Technology, in fact, can make the learning process, for students and employees alike, both interactive and participatory.

  245. This is a great advice for us, this made me decide that it is not always about following the traditional way. People can also customize and make their own way or follow their own unique ideas just make a back up preventive measures just in case. This is great, thank you so much!

  246. Changing the organizational culture by putting the HOW (the process) before the WHY (the purpose), or the WHAT (the product). However, there’s a catch, this method might have been successful to others but this might also be not applicable to you so you better make a preventive measure before trying to implement this on your own. You are the best Arthur Carmazzi, providing this changes to us but still not casting away the chances that this might be not applicable to all and providing a preventive measure. Thank you so much, you really are awesome!

  247. The risk of engaging in a culture change is too much optimism and expectation. It is wrong to depend on the success of others in deciding to engage as well. A wonderful preventive measures, this is a great help Arthur Carmazzi. Thank you so much!

  248. Pushing people into an immediate changing company culture will sometimes lead to killing the innovation and passion around the company. This is a great advice Arthur, will surely look into this to prevent it to happen in the future.

  249. This is so amazing to know, thank you so much for this Sir Arthur Carmazzi! I understand that insisting certain culture change will somehow lead to the downfall of the company. The whole company should be in sink upon stepping in a culture change.

  250. You are correct in regards to this idea Arthur Carmazzi. For me, it won’t hurt if you try to be different a little bit or if changing company culture will occur one day. You’ll just need to be alert or have focused on it, keep in mind that every company culture has a unique characteristic. Some might succeed in a certain technique, but you don’t have to imitate and be dependent on that action as your company had also its own unique qualities.

  251. Following a traditional business plan can help many companies make progress, breaking out of the mold with unconventional practices can offer unique advantages, as well as success for companies of all sizes. Businesses as large as Google to those as small as a single bakery shop, for example, demonstrate how non-traditional companies can flourish and succeed.

  252. Each business can set up their own organizational culture, it will depend on them on how they’ll manage it for themselves whether it will be the traditional way or the non-traditional way. This is the best I learned in reading this blog, this will help me a lot and of course a lot more people that will read this. Looking forward to your other blogs.

  253. This best describes and remind people to think carefully what would be the effect of a culture change not only to the company but also to the employees as well, because if this plan might be able to lead to dividing factor.

  254. I have only one thing to say about your Start with HOW post. I assume it is an addition to the start with WHY, and this does seem like a good addition, both are important, well done Mr. Arthur Carmazzi

  255. It best explained that sometimes being unique is effective in changing company culture, however, to assure you that that move will not make your organization casualty, prepare a suitable preventive measure in case the worst case scenario occurs.

  256. This was the best illustration of moving out of your comfort zone and try something. Be unique and don’t be too dependent on what is traditionally or what people are used to.

  257. This was the best illustration of moving out of your comfort zone and try something. Be unique and don’t be too dependent on what is traditionally or what people are used to.

  258. Sometimes, in handling an organizational culture you must be unique in the way that you don’t to follow the traditional way so much. There is always a risk anywhere so don’t be afraid to risk sometimes.

  259. This blog best explain that people don’t need to be too dependent on what others used to do, or what they call the traditional way of changing company culture. It is just that failing is really everywhere and anyone can be a victim, it depends on an individual on how they’ll gonna handle that failure. One is to have a preventive measure just in case failure strikes you.

  260. In changing organizational culture sometimes following what the trend is effective. Just like starting start with HOW and not with the traditional WHY just like what this Sir Arthur’s blog says.

  261. In changing company culture, to choose a method that will not only benefit the company but also will help the employees to adjust to the process because they are the heart and soul of an organization.

  262. I learned here that instating a specific approach or purpose of the culture change might affect the people around the organization. Instead, explain them the process directly and let them adjust at their own will or in their most suitable way that will not affect their will and happiness in working. By that, you don’t have to push them from time to time to blend with the change which is their heart at work is missing, instead, they will do it on their own and will continue to work passionately.

  263. I learned through this blog that by using the idea of “Start with How” and starting with an approach of explaining the process needed for the culture change, this method may prevent what they call “Dividing Factor” that might be bad for the organization.

  264. I truly understand that the traditional “Start with why” or the purpose of the business, this method will give people in an organization a fixed approach on why and what they are needed to do or accomplish. From there, the “Dividing Factor” comes in as this method might ruin or destroy the innovation and passion from each of them as clearly stated here.

  265. Introducing different approaches might give the employees a hard time to adapt to it and might cause to lose their will and heart in work. It is stated here that it can be avoided by using the method “Start with How” as stated here. This is very interesting and helpful article. Thank you so much!

  266. In studying the leaders who’ve had the greatest influence in the world, they discovered that they all think, act, and communicate in the exact same way-and it’s the complete opposite of what everyone else does. People like Martin Luther King Jr., Steve Jobs, and the Wright Brothers might have little in common, but they all started with why. However, I best learned here that is some way company owners or leaders should also think about their employees or people inside their organization because using that method, they will surely struggle in a way and it may also affect their work or passion in work.

  267. “A powerful and penetrating exploration of what separates great companies and great leaders from the rest.” This is how other describe the method “Start With Why” and to be honest, I was once one of them and I am amazed at how this idea was presented. However, as I’ve read this article of yours it woke me up and changes my mind. I was so amazed that there is a more suitable way or method in changing company culture and it was what explained here, the “Start With How” by you Mr. Arthur Carmazzi. Thank you so much!

  268. In culture change, in stating a method like the traditional “START WITH WHY” or the purpose of this change might lead the people to lose their eagerness and love for work. Instead, as I’ve learned here, much better to focus and provide them the new process and let them do what or where they are comfortable in regards to the change and let them enjoy, or simply saying “START WITH HOW”. Thank you so much for this idea!

  269. The purpose is personal and is who you are. In business terms, the purpose is all about your mission. Every person, team, and organization needs a reason for being. When we lack purpose, we don’t know what we’re doing, let alone why we’re doing it. However, it is more useful in changing company culture to explain the process to the people before the purpose as it is explained here. Think of them, each and everyone inside the organization. Sometimes running an organization or a company didn’t always all about the company itself.

  270. The purpose of an auditing procedure is the overall reason that it’s being conducted. The purpose is broader than the objective, in that it refers to the main reason the audit was called in the first place. For instance, if a company official realizes that there are several errors in the organization’s financial statements, an audit may be called to get to the bottom of the errors. If an official is suspected of fraud, the purpose of an audit would be to expose the fraud or to determine whether the accusation was false. I appreciate that it was best explained here that “Start with Why” or the purpose of the culture change might lead to dividing factor of the company.

  271. The answer to the “purpose” question will drive your personal choices and decisions. At work, the company’s purpose will affect the entire business plan, necessary skill sets, and investments, and it will identify potential customers. The company’s purpose will get rid of the individual purpose of each individual within the organization and this might possibly lead to what they call here the “Dividing Factor”.

  272. As a small to medium business, it is common that internal process workflow can many times get overlooked. Even though it’s an integral part of all businesses, having business workflows implemented and documented usually takes a back seat to other business operations. In most cases, businesses will operate well enough without a defined workflow process.

  273. Whether you’re a large enterprise business or a small 20-user company, Business Workflow Process can help you become more efficient and more profitable. To find out more about our consulting services that include Enterprise Resource Planning, IT Infrastructure Planning, and Process Workflow Management, contact NetWork Center, Inc. for more information.

  274. Implementing a business workflow process forces each business to review their processes in fine detail. This exercise is a great way to find out what areas of workflow need work or are missing completely. I’ve assisted customers to create a complete workflow system starting with nothing. After discussing general workflow with management I interviewed department managers and created workflow documentation that was later reviewed and approved by management. This allowed the business to see the areas that lacked detail in the process. Once we defined those areas, managers were able to “fill the gap” with new process documentation to give employees clear definition of the process.

  275. Focusing on product, process, and people will empower you to create value where there was none before, instill processes that will grow your company and nurture relationships across the board to show that you truly care. By being purposeful, you’ll stay on mission and deliver world-class experiences to everyone who comes into contact with your brand. That is why I agree with Mr. Arthur in this article that businesses must put their “HOW” (process) before their “WHY” (purpose).

  276. Beyond the number of stages or steps upon which any change process should be structured, and no matter the degree of intensity with which the hidden dimensions should be tackled for change to become meaningful at the visible surface, these three active principles are unavoidably essential.

  277. Many organizations drew from the magnificent body of the theory held within management bestsellers, convinced that applying such models would bring the rains of change, whereby organizational waters would return to their source. Unfortunately, many organizations have also seen this was not quite true…

  278. There is an ever-increasing need for change management among many companies. The loss of market share due to the entry of new and unexpected competitors, the shake-up in the sector thanks to changes in consumer habits, or simply the obsolescence of products and services have stepped up the need to manage change in many companies. As to be expected, the vast majority of these companies were not ready to embark upon a change process to their success.

  279. “P” for protagonists, primordial, primary, principal, but above all, “P” for people. Nothing happens without them and their infinite capacity for action. If an organization does not wholeheartedly empower the people within to work on the purpose and to break down and work on processes, change just will not happen. Many organizations, and paradoxically, the people who work within, are the ones who in turn restrain the third active principle of change management. It’s curious how we ourselves working to fulfill the purpose, on the processes and even scientifically defining the phases of change, do not give ourselves or our environment the role that really corresponds to us in the change process.

  280. The change process does not involve following a series of steps faithfully. Once the purpose has been defined, the second active principle entails the processes and more specifically the breakdown of these processes. All too often, organizations take on macro change management processes without analyzing in detail the impact such processes have on the business. Culture and beliefs are attacked, but the processes and the interaction flows for making things happen to remain impassable. It is crucial and decisive to understand that regardless of any stage, beyond any phase, a change process is a change in processes… Thus influencing them, breaking them down, and questioning their validity in order for things to occur are an essential tenet for any attempt in change management.

  281. The reference to both, models or theories, was necessary because these pave the way for this article entry. Hybridizing the essence of both approaches with over 15 years of accumulated professional experience in change management, I believe there are three key active principles essential for conducting a change management process for even nominal success: purpose, processes, and people. Beyond the number of stages or steps upon which any change process should be structured, and no matter the degree of intensity with which the hidden dimensions should be tackled for change to become meaningful at the visible surface, these three active principles are unavoidably essential.

  282. Probably the trigger for the other two basic principles. The reason for a change. Any company that aims to efficiently complete a change process must rigorously define the precise sense of the process. Without a clearly defined and sound purpose for change, it is unlikely that change management will be lasting. Many companies work on their culture, on the deeply rooted beliefs and scrupulously follow the theoretical stages. Working, strengthening, and of course, communicating the purpose/s of change goes far beyond establishing a sense of urgency and developing a vision and a strategy. The purpose must scrupulously define without any frills the need for change, simply because with no purpose, there will be no paradise…

  283. The change process does not involve following a series of steps faithfully. Once the purpose has been defined, the second active principle entails the processes and more specifically the breakdown of these processes. All too often, organizations take on macro change management processes without analyzing in detail the impact such processes have on the business. Culture and beliefs are attacked, but the processes and the interaction flows for making things happen to remain impassable. It is crucial and decisive to understand that regardless of any stage, beyond any phase, a change process is a change in processes… Thus influencing them, breaking them down, and questioning their validity in order for things to occur are an essential tenet for any attempt in change management.

  284. Mistakes caused by improper process control will lead an effect on the image and fortunes of the changing company culture. If the mistake happened to cause the problem for customers, the company will get possible lawsuits. At last, the lack of proper process control can cause a diminish in the confidence of customers. I’m really a fan of your blogs sir Arthur Carmazzi!

  285. We all know that process control can cause a lot of problems. Do you know the specific problems? Generally speaking, the problem which is failed to be addressed originally will become a huge burden for the changing company culture. When it becomes costlier, there will be an increase in steel pipe prices for steel pipe organizations. This importance of process control is more apparent for vehicle manufacturers. Companies will assume a huge loss if a mistake cannot be handled properly. It will cost a lot of time to address the fault, so the loss is not only money but also time.I like every little detail of this blog sir Arthur Carmazzi.

  286. I am looking forward to your next blog Arthur Carmazzi! In the manufacturing industry, process control is very important in the overall production. What is process control? As a matter of fact, process control refers to a tight control by manufacturers such as steel pipe manufacturer, companies, and producers. The process control includes the oversight of various components and steps involved in the production of products or service. Why does this process important? Actually, the importance of process control lies in business adopting this control. In order to increase the quality of their products, businessmen are likely to conduct the application of process control which can also reduce the mishaps of production. As you know, customers are instrumental in running a business, process control can make sure that changing company culture can maintain loyal customers who are prone to high-quality products and services.

  287. People usually consider project management and process management as two different things having no relation to each other. You must have read people saying that time management, risk management, cost management, quality management etc is very important for running and completing a project successfully but have you heard any person saying that process management is also very crucial for the success of a project? I am sure, your answer will be no. It is due to the fact that we do not have insight information about process management and how it works on culture change. You are so brilliant, Arthur Carmazzi!

  288. In every organizational culture and leader of each company know the WHAT. They can describe their products, their industry, and their competitors. Some companies also know HOW they do it, their unique differentiators, their value proposition, and their values. But few companies know or articulate their HOW, which is more important as per this blog by Mr. Arthur Carmazzi. You are amazing Sir!

  289. From my experience in changing company culture, the more I’ve been able to understand and communicate a process, the better I’ve been at improving it. If you cannot understand a process, it’s pretty hard to improve it. Not impossible but hard. If you don’t understand a process it can be hard troubleshooting issues with it. To troubleshoot, you often have to understand the process in the first place. Do I get it Mr. Arthur Carmazzi?

  290. Very well said Mr. Arthur Carmazzi, when talking about processes at conferences and events I always get pushback from managers who state they value people over process, or they don’t like to standardize, or they have no processes at all. The reality is that all businesses have processes. Whether you are aware of them, understand them and can communicate them is the real discussion. When any work moves through a business it is following a process of some sort, even a chaotic one. Work of a similar nature may follow a similar process or a different one. As a manager, you may know the processes workflows through, or you may not.

  291. A core aspect of your job as a manager should be to understand your processes and improve them for the culture change. Your success lies partly in having the right processes in place. You’re the best Arthur Carmazzi!

  292. The leadership development described within the case studies run the gamut from developmental to transformational. Ready, immediate, in-house access to a range of journals is at the heart of academic library services. The decision to shift to providing access by paying user fees rather than purchasing materials remains controversial. This is a big help, Mr. Arthur Carmazzi! Thank you so much.

  293. You can identify single points of failure or the reliance on heroes. Single points of failure will bring the process down if they fail. You should mitigate against this if you can. People are usually single points of failure. This leads me on to heroes, who are people who often hold entire departments up. They are valuable as they pick up problems, but the hero doesn’t share. They don’t delegate, or automate, or improve. Awesome stuff here arthur carmazzi!

  294. In my experience, the induction process needs to be flexible. It needs to accommodate the fact that each department will have specific challenges and activities relevant to just them. There will always be some commonalities though, and these should be consistent across the company. So the process should be flexible to absorb variety but consistent when it needs to be. It should support the purpose of the process, especially for leadership.
    Nice one here Arthur Carmazzi!

  295. Those involved must truly be aligned with what the best company culture is that fits the ultimate vision of the organization. Make sense, your words are so amazing as always Sir Arthur Carmazzi.

  296. It must be done as Arthur Carmazzi said. Whether senior leaders are working with consultants or working together as a committee, company culture and values should be memorialized on paper.

  297. While the majority of this book is about companies and the people who lead them, it is completely relatable to your personal life outside of work. Just like how Arthur Carmazzi explains it though.

  298. Arthur Carmazzi is one of the most-viewed ever; and it’s really quite good. In fact, it’s so good that you don’t need to read his blog! He takes a very, very simple concept and expands, and expands, and repeats, and seemingly never edits, and then repeats, and expands, and — well, you get the idea. The whole thing could’ve been done in 50 pages or less.

  299. The constitution is another great example of a WHY & HOW which guides us in an ever evolving WHAT. It doesnt try to make every law, or build every system. The constitution is our WHY, followed by our HOW.

  300. I’ve read and studied a lot of material over the last 2 years looking for answers to my life and business. What I didn’t realize, is that I was looking for this blog. Thanks for the leadership training Arthur Carmazzi.

  301. The objective of process benchmarking is not to calculate a quantitative performance gap, but to identify best practices that may be adapted for improvement of performance for each organizational culture. It is a discovery methodology that is used to stimulate learning and help organizations to think about creative options for the design and implementation of its business processes. I love this part of your blog Arthur Carmazzi.

  302. A process is very vital to a company, especially on changing company culture. They must be properly handled for the success of the business. I’ll be following you from here sir Arthur Carmazzi!

  303. The essence of a process in an organizational culture benchmarking is making comparisons based on facts and then using these facts to discover knowledge that leads to enhanced performance. You are superb Sir Arthur Carmazzi.

  304. While the majority of this BLOG is about companies and the people who lead them, it is completely relatable to your personal life outside of work. Years ago, I worked for a company led by a man who clearly started with how.

  305. “Company culture represents collective norms and behaviors. It’s hard enough to change one person’s behavior, so how can you change the behavior of an entire organization?” This terms helped me a lot to prepare for future purposes. You’ve nailed it Sir Arthur Carmazzi!

  306. The simple fact is that you cannot define management or leadership training in a simple, concise statement. It is far too complex. However, the fact is that it does involve getting other people to perform tasks that must be done in order to meet project or organizational objectives. This hypes me up Arthur Carmazzi, I can’t wait for your next blog.

  307. Business is all about getting the job done for your customer or client and being compensated for it. All the processes and efficiencies that can be mustered to make things run smoothly and reach the endgame should be the number one priority. In changing company culture, people can deflect and also be deflected. Managers have to swing into action. I will take note of this Arthur Carmazzi.

  308. A company’s culture is the only truly unique identifier. It is like a fingerprint, it may be similar to others but is uniquely distinct to your business. Everything else (products, strategies, marketing, even innovations) can be replicated, but the only truly unique identifiers are the values and norms of the organizational culture or personality. Love your way sharing us you knowledge Arthur Carmazzi. Thank you so much!

  309. People are comfortable with the current organizational culture. For people to consider culture change, usually a significant event must occur. An event that rocks their world such as a burning platform. So before you get buy-in, people need to feel the problem. People aren’t going to consider anything until they are convinced there is a problem that truly needs to be addressed. I will surely take note of this sir Arthur Carmazzi.

  310. What are the most important values you would like to see represented in your organizational culture? For me, this question will help the company to grow. Thank you so much Arthur Carmazzi for sharing this simple question to us yet very helpful.

  311. To recognize that the organizational culture is the culprit and to take steps to change it, is a tough journey. When people in an organization realize and recognize that their current organizational culture needs to transform to support the organization’s success and progress, change can occur.

  312. Your organizational culture defines for you and for all others, how your organization does business, how your organization interacts with one another and how the team interacts with the outside world, specifically your customers, employees, partners, suppliers, media and all other stakeholders.

  313. An organizational culture is the only truly unique identifier. It is like a fingerprint, it may be similar to others but is uniquely distinct to your business. Everything else (products, strategies, marketing, even innovations) can be replicated, but the only truly unique identifiers are the values and norms of the organization – its culture, or personality.

  314. Organizational culture consists of shared beliefs and values established by the organization’s leaders and then communicated and reinforced through various methods, ultimately shaping employee perceptions, behaviors, and understanding. Simply speaking, a company’s structure and design can be viewed as its body and its culture as its soul.

  315. A strong organizational culture, in which members agree upon and care intensely about organizational values, can improve business performance by motivating employees and coordinating their behavior towards a vision and specific performance goals that benefit the company. Very well said here Mr. Arthur Carmazzi.

  316. This is very moving sir Arthur Carmazzi! Your organizational culture is the formula, the DNA that provides guidelines, boundaries, and expectations for your team and your customers, and is the primary platform to inspiring and motivating your people, and is the most powerful resource you have to attract, recruit, hire and retain the highest level of talent to your business. The best people, always want to work with the best companies, and the best people are the catalyst for creating ongoing business success.

  317. Before a company changing culture occur, it must first understand the current culture or the way things are now. This is one of the best things I’ve learned since I followed you Sir Arthur Carmazzi. Thank you so much for that!

  318. Once you understand your current organizational culture, your organization must then decide where it wants to go, define its strategic direction, and decide what the organizational culture should look like to support success. What vision does the organization have for its future and how must the culture change support the accomplishment of that vision? This are some pointers I’ve learned from you sir Arthur Carmazzi.

  319. Knowing what the desired organizational culture looks like is not enough. Organizations must create plans to ensure that the desired organizational culture becomes a reality. A wonderful and very informative lesson I’ve learned from you Sir Arthur Carmazzi.

  320. The individuals in the organization must decide to change their behavior to create the desired organizational culture. This is the hardest step in culture change. I will always put this in mind Arthur Carmazzi because I’m sure that this will help me a lot someday.

  321. Telling employees what is expected of them is critical for effective organizational culture change. Make them prepare for the role they are pursuing the benefits of both parties. You are so amazing and as bright as ever Mr. Arthur Carmazzi.

  322. There are many benefits to having a positive company culture. These include good (transparent) open communication that helps departments and employees work and collaborate better together towards the achievement of company goals. You are very impressive Sir Arthur Carmazzi.

  323. A shared vision and clear mission across the entire organization, leading to employees working towards common goals. This will also help the company to its organizational culture. I’m so proud of you Arthur Carmazzi

  324. Company culture is a soft concept, if there’s no concrete way of defining or measuring culture, then how can you change it? This is one key point I’ve learned in following you Sir Arthur Carmazzi. Thank you so much for this!

  325. It is very important to know that all change in organizations is challenging, but perhaps the most daunting is changing company culture. Thank you so much letting us know about this Sir Arthur Carmazzi.

  326. As per what Mr. Arthur Carmazzi said, it takes a long time to see the benefits of an improved company culture, so initiatives are often not maintained/sustained for the amount of time it takes for change to happen, as competing priorities for time, people and budget come into play in an ever-competitive and changing the marketplace.

  327. What I got from Mr. Arthur Carmazzi is that successful company cultures exist in many unique forms, and what works for one, may not work for another. Be unique, but be true to your values. Attempting to create an all-inclusive culture fit for any personality often leads to an uncomfortable work environment for everyone involved. When you determine what culture is right for your business, stick to it.

  328. A culture deck is a series of slides using short phrases, images or examples to define and describe the behavior of your organization. Business leaders should develop this unique to their firm, then share it with everyone on your team, from top execs to new hires.

  329. As I learned to Mr. Arthur Carmazzi, it’s not that company culture was ever unimportant, but it’s quickly proving to be a “necessary” to achieve strong results, rather than a “nice-to-have.”

  330. When a company has good communication between its employees, it can often avoid conflict as employees work through challenges. A company culture that is not transparent and does not disseminate information well to everyone, typically have a hard time achieving strong business results, or even staying in business. You’re so brilliant Arthur Carmazzi!

  331. Strong communication is key. In organization’s culture where good communication is encouraged, where upper-level executives freely communicate with lower-level employees and vice versa with respect and without judgment, the company often implements an open-door communication policy with their employees.

  332. Thank you for sharing Arthur Carmazzi, one important aspect that deserves mentioning is that even though company culture should be set by leadership, it is important to involve all people in the company to help set and shape those values and vision. This creates a sense of ownership so that employees take it as their own and not a forced system defined from the top.

  333. I will take note of this words Mr. Arthur Carmazzi. “Working with an organization of values, character and strong company culture will help you be more successful. If you are not there now, you should go find it.” Thank you so much!

  334. I love this note of you Arthur Carmazzi. The most common mistake in regards to company culture is defining it, only to soon forget about it. If culture is important to your company’s success, address it often and often publicly recognize individuals, teams or units that exemplify or demonstrate what your culture is and what you aspire to be.

  335. When businesses are growing rapidly, it’s easy to justify hiring candidates with impressive resumes or recommendations, without first considering cultural fit. Under pressure, some may even ignore obvious signs of a potential company culture clash just to get the hiring job done, but this is the beginning of a problem for your corporate culture, as all must buy into the culture, and many people who don’t fit will become a problem later. Develop the discipline to consider new hire cultural compatibility and reinforce its importance to all involved in the onboarding process. Now I know that those things are important, Sir Arthur Carmazzi. Thank you so much!

  336. To develop a truly great company culture, there can only be one model. This means no special rules or exceptions for any subgroup, including top executives. As such, your leadership team should consist of the strongest cultural fits. Often the faces of the company, they will show others how to live the corporate culture every day.

  337. Lay it out beautifully sir Arthur Carmazzi. This is what needed to be done by the new startup to retain their most talented team players in their company which truly understand the organizational culture.

  338. Great article Sir Arthur Carmazzi. The value of company culture can’t be overstated. From experience, I’d also suggest values are made relevant and ‘front of mind’ at a team level. Teams ability to own and get regular feedback on how they’re aligning with values is extremely important.

  339. Sir Arthur Carmazzi nailed it. I have witnessed businesses that speak often of an intentional company culture only to make exceptions that bring their cultural momentum to a halt. True commitment to the desired culture should not be sacrificed for a short-term gain. Staying the course has a greater payoff.

  340. Company culture is relevant and important in creating success towards corp goals, but it has such a large footprint and so many moving parts, that many CEO’s and senior managers struggle to create a realistic, company-wide, actionable plan that is directly tied to KPI’s (Key Performance Indicator) and actions across the whole organization.

  341. I’ve read and studied a lot of material over the last 2 years about organizational culture for my life and business. What I didn’t realize, is that I was looking for this inspirational blog from a respectable Guru. I am grateful to learn these things from you Sir Arthur Carmazzi.

  342. Employee promotions, pay practices, performance management and employee selection to make sure they are aligned with the desired organizational culture. I am really learning a lot from you Arthur Carmazzi, and you’re inspiring me every day.

  343. He explains that these successes were built around great people who inspired others These people may not have been great at business, in fact, some did not know how to put together a business plan, but they understood what was most important to them.

  344. Organizational culture is a hard thing to get right. It’s a moving target that means something different to everyone. It grows and evolves over time and is the result of action and reaction. It is the lingering effect of every interaction.

  345. Success in the business world is nearly magic. You can gob of money and loads of talent and still be bankrupt in a year. History is riddled with huge companies failing while small startups become huge successes. This is what brings me to follow Arthur Carmazzi about leadership training.

  346. My changing company culture is much bigger so it’s tough to compare, but I definitely believe that the leadership understands WHY and HOW as well.

    I think everyone should read this blog. Thanks Arthur Carmazzi!

  347. my former colleagues and I still talk about Arthur Carmazzi and the site with love and devotion for leadership trainings and all. We describe it as a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that those who never experienced it couldn’t possibly understand.

  348. For a simple concept book, Start With Why was rather fascinating. It prompted me to look at my own work again; to remember why my career, leadership development and how things will be better if I remember the “why.” Thank you so much Arthur Carmazzi!

  349. A helpful wisdom that I will treasure from sir Arthur Carmazzi is such as, “Company culture is defined as the identity and personality of an organization. It consists of the shared thoughts, assumptions, behaviors, and values of the employees and stakeholders.”

  350. Thank you as always Mr. Arthur Carmazzi, I am always amazed by your blogs as I continue following you. This will surely help all your followers in regards to Organizational Culture.

  351. Company culture is dynamic, ever-changing, and evolves with time and new experiences. Many factors help drive and define the culture, including leadership styles, policies, and procedures (or sometimes lack thereof), titles, hierarchy, as well as the overall demographics and workspace.

  352. Companies often take a passive approach to an organizational culture. They figure it’s not something they can control or that they need to control. If they leave it alone, it’ll all work itself out. Words of wisdom from Sir Arthur Carmazzi. Thank you so much!

  353. Company culture gives employees a driving goal and purpose for what they do. It connects your leadership team with the rest of the employees and binds them with a set of shared beliefs. Your employees want to feel like they are contributing to something larger than themselves. It is so assuring sir Arthur Carmazzi that you are here, I will be following your blogs.

  354. The reality is that company culture is a business issue that has a significant impact on a venture’s ability to generate a return on investment and should be prioritized and measured just like other business objectives such as financial growth, product development, sales, marketing and the like.

  355. the idea is worth the cost of the blog and the time to read it,
    This covers virtually all the core ideas involved. with this understanding that “HOW” means something different in each of the two contexts he contrasts.

  356. I get it! It’s not enough to follow your passion, you got to know why and HOW you’re passionate about it. I highly recommend Arthur Carmazzi blog to anyone struggling to figure out what they want to do when they grow up. I’m off to read his follow-up book, Find the inner HOW.

  357. This is one of the most useful and powerful articles I have read in years. Simple and elegant, it shows us how leadership should be. Awesome guy Arthur Carmazzi!

  358. I also realized, Across every category buyers respond to functional concerns. How is this product or service better than other available options? They ask “how” questions, not “why” questions.

  359. If you want to set a clear and compelling path for your company or organization, then “start with why” is bad advice.
    Teams that survive and thrive?
    They start with “how,” instead. Just my two cents.

  360. I’ve struggled to consistently help my clients discover their “how” and use it to inform decisions on everything from hiring, to new product development.

  361. Arthur Carmazzi’s message is incredibly influential. Countless companies have worked to package their how, and incorporate it into their brand messaging.

  362. Well, most employees care about how workplace changes affect them, and with each change they face, they determine whether it has had a negative, neutral, or positive effect on their job.

  363. People buy products and services to fulfill their needs. If you run out of toilet paper are you going to research the beliefs of paper manufacturers?right? awesome guy Arhthur carmazzi has it.

  364. The goal is not to do business with everybody that needs what you have. The goal is to do business with the people who believe what you believe..same aspects I guess for Arthur Carmazzi.

  365. Starting with why when you start your business can be intimidating, fuzzy and uncertain at first. Or maybe your why doesn’t seem very differentiating from your competitors. And it’s not always easy to tackle the words that describe the spark inside you, urging you to create your own thing.

    My advice to you if you can’t find your why is : Start with How.

  366. I’ve shared clips of his talk in workshops and coaching sessions. I’ve even facilitated discussions for company leaders who wanted to define and clarify their “why.”

  367. While no article stands alone, this blog of Arthur Carmazzi puts the big picture together for me. How I can find myself drifting from one opportunity to the next, with nothing more than fleeting excitement for a new idea. This book has inspired many thoughts as I read it, but it has helped me to truly put into perspective the age-old advice to follow your passion.

  368. As pointed out already, the message is indeed excellent and it got me interested when I first read it! Nonetheless, Arthur Carmazzi is really known for his excellent leadership.

  369. This was a fantastic blog by Arthur Carmazzi. I love that this idea is spreading and in a world of doers, remembering/rediscovering/discovering the WHY and HOW are a powerful way to bring about positive change and move the world forward.

  370. While no blog or Guru stands alone, this man puts the big picture together for me. Without a ‘How’ I can find myself drifting from one opportunity to the next, with nothing more than fleeting excitement for a new idea. This blog has inspired many thoughts as I read it, but it has helped me to truly put into perspective the age-old advice to follow your passion. It’s not enough to follow your passion, you got to know why you’re passionate about it. I highly recommend this blog and you as an amazing Guru to anyone struggling to figure out what they want to do when they grow up. I’m off to read his follow-up blog, Find Your How.

  371. As I follow Sir Arthur Carmazzi, he totally opposed the Golden Circle which is once popularized and I can say that his idea is very interesting. It is to make your ‘How’ your most priority. Thank you so much, Sir! You are amazing!

  372. This blog is great for those who are leaders, are trying to become leaders or just want some inspiration in your everyday life. The only down side is that it was a bit repetitive, but it got the point across.

  373. This blog was amazing from the start it had great information on what makes a good company and why and how great companies are where they are today as a multi-million dollar company. It also lives up to the title “Start With how” because it shows how companies start.
    This blog from Arthur Carmazzi is definitely inspiring and makes you put your own life into perspective.

  374. In light of the last decade of greed and short-term trading mentality with little regard for future consequences, I found myself wholeheartedly agreeing with Arthur Carmazzi’s observations in organizational culture that there are no shortcuts to long-term success

  375. if you are responsible for developing engagement, strategy, or similar programs for your company, I would consider this a must read. If that’s not what you need, there is still plenty of value to the blog.

  376. The concepts in this blog from Arthur Carmazzi are wonderful. It helped me reaffirm many of the ways I think about and approach challenges while also introducing some new things to think about.

  377. How does one create such kinship with customers? The blog explains the concept, which shows business leaders how to inspire instead of manipulating customers or employees to act. Arthur Carmazzi explains that trust is built naturally when you target customers that understand and believe in HOW too.